Culture

Where do lucky charms come from?

Small objects that have the power to keep bad luck away. Worn around your neck, put in a specific corner of the house, in your pocket, in your bag: there is something for everyone. Especially when it comes to facing difficult and important challenges in one's life, we all get a little superstitious. There are those who are superstitious only in special occasions and those who always surround themselves with amulets hoping to shed bad luck.  Every country has its own. There is the shamrock in Ireland, the golden toad in China, the painted horse in Sweden, the scarab in Egypt, the red horn in Italy. In addition to being associated with supernatural powers, good luck charms are above all fascinating cultural symbols.  According to psychology professor Richard Wiseman, "the fa...

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Arts

The artist Jago speaks out against covid related social crisis through a marble sculpture in the heart of Naples

On 5 November 2020 Naples woke up to a new piece of art in the heart of the city. That day, the first people walking in Piazza Plebiscito, one of Naples' landmarks, found right there, in the middle of the square, a large marble sculpture depicting the body of a newborn baby.  It is the work of the Italian artist and entrepreneur Jacopo Cardillo, aka Jago, born in Frosinone in 1987 and very popular nationally and internationally. In fact, he lives in New York and works in Italy, USA and China where he also holds several courses in schools, universities and academies. The sculpture in question represents a frozen, curled up and white baby, one meter and sixty-five long, equally large, and sixty-four centimeters tall. A huge infant in a fetal position, tied to the floor of the squ...

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