Culture

Extraordinary archaeological discovery: fossil remains of the first European wolf found in Rome

It almost seems like the confirmation of the legend prowdly handed down by Romans since ancient times: that of the she-wolf who founded Rome. This time, however, it is not a matter of myths and legends, but rather a sensational archaeological discovery. In the Italian capital it has in fact been found the fossil of the first European wolf. The discovery, which took place in Ponte Galeria (near the area of Via Portuense) at the hands of a team of paleontologists and geologists from the Department of Earth Sciences of the University La Sapienza and the Department of Earth Sciences "Ardito Desio" in Milan, uncovered the remains of a large fossil canid skull dating back to 400,000 years ago. It was thanks to the 3D reconstruction that it was possible to identify the fossil as "the oldest a...

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Arts

Record auction for Magritte: the empire of lights is worth 52 million euros

Helena Newman, Head of Europe at Sotheby's, announced the presence of the painting in the next auction on 2nd March in London: "The empire of lights brings together two fundamental elements of everyday life - day and night - on a paradoxical canvas.". Magritte created the picture in 1961 and dedicated it to Anne Marie Gillion Crowet, daughter of the patron Pierre Crowet, a historical friend of the painter. He certainly never expected his "empire des lumières" to be not only considered one of the most representative works of surrealism, but also to reach an estimate of € 52 million by Sotheby's. The famous canvas, until now, had been part of the Crowet family collection, lent to the Magritte Museum in Brussels from 2009 to 2020. The dimensions of the work of art are also important,...

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Culture

Sumatra: the discovery of an earthquake that lasted 32 years

What is considered the longest earthquake in history dates back to 1861. It is still the object of study by experts today to prevent a similar phenomenon from happening again in the future. In Indonesia, near the island of Sumatra, about 160 years ago an earthquake of magnitude 8.5 killed thousands of people by raising a wall of water that hit the coastal area of ​​the island. What could have looked like an earthquake like so many others turned out to be the culminating phase of a "silent" earthquake that began some 32 years earlier. Earthquakes of this type are called "slow sliding events", lasting several days, months or even years. But even within this very particular category, the Sumatra earthquake remains an exceptional case, for its thirty-year duration, double the earthquake wh...

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